What Is a CV? Resume Writing CV Writing Is Different!

What Is a CV? Resume Writing CV Writing Is Different!

If you live in England then you will most likely use the word “CV” to refer to the document you use for applying for a job. If you live in America, then there is a strong chance that you–and your future hiring manager–will use the word “resume.” But did you know that in Australia they use both? So what is a CV/Resume? Of course, there are a couple of differences and that is why we have created this article for you, so you can learn everything you need to know and in half the time it would normally take you.

CV, or Curriculum Vitae

Choosing a resume vs choosing a CV depends on your choice of targeted positions. By: Guilhem Vellut
Choosing a resume vs choosing a CV depends on your choice of targeted positions. By: Guilhem Vellut

A CV is a document that is spread out over a couple of pages and functions like a career biography. It covers your education, your accomplishments and anything else as well. A CV is normally organized chronologically and it is designed to give the employer a full picture about who you are and what you do. Usually, the CV is used by those in academic roles.

Resume

A resume is a document that details your professional career history with deep investigation into your accomplishments and why they were valuable. It is used for most professions, from biotech to health care to truck driving, from individual contributor roles through management and executive positions. Your resume will have, at a minimum, the following elements:

  • Header, with your name and contact information.
  • A brief statement about your career brand.
  • Descriptions of each role you have held.
  • What you did in each of those roles.
  • Your education and certifications.

Of course, there are some exceptions when it comes to your targeted role and future employer; sometimes your future hiring manager may ask you more questions about what they need from you.

If you want to find out more then contact Everyday Resumes today. We can help you with all aspects of your resume, cover letter, and job search.

How to Type a Resume with Readable Fonts

How to Type a Resume with Readable Fonts

If you want to know how to type a resume then the first thing you will want to do is make sure that you choose the right font. With so many fonts to choose from, it can be hard to know which one is suitable for your needs and this can make it even more difficult for you to get everything sorted. Take a look below to see some of the top fonts and how they could make your resume really stand out.

Calibri

Calibri is an excellent choice for anyone who wants to type up their resume with crystal clear clarity. It is universally readable and it works very well on a computer screen as well. If your resume is over or just under two pages then you will want to go with size 10.5 or 11 points. The main reason for this is because it can space it out perfectly for you as well as making sure that you are always giving the reader a perfectly formatted document.

Garamond

How to Type a Resume with Readable Fonts
How to Type a Resume with Readable Fonts By: HeavenlyCabins

Garamond is ideal for those who are looking for a traditional, old-style font and it is ideal for those who want to make their resume shine as well. It has an elegant structure and it is very polished in terms of the way the text is presented, so it will look professional and be easy to read, both in the headlines (larger font size) and smaller body sizes. Although Garamond might look tiny on your screen, at 11 points it prints very well.

Of course, these are just the two fonts that you need to look out for and you would be surprised at how easy it is for you to get these on your document. It would also be an idea for you to increase the size of some of your headlines because this will help them to stand out as well as making sure that they are completely readable throughout the page.

How Do You Spell Resume?

How Do You Spell Resume?

How do you spell resume? The noun “résumé” refers to a documentation of someone’s career or job accomplishments. It is ingrained English and for that reason, you don’t actually need to put the accent marks in it. A lot of people still include these accent marks because it makes note that the word is being used as a noun and not a verb, with the verb meaning to begin again after experiencing an interruption. If you were to send a resume in French then you would put an acute accent over both of the E’s. If you were to spell it in American English, however, then you could go by the Webster’s New World Dictionary‘s recommendations of “resumé” or “résumé.” At the end of the day, how you spell resume is completely up to you, and it doesn’t matter whether you want to accent it or not.

Funny, But You Don’t Need to Spell “Resume” on Your Resume

How do you spell resume?
How do you spell resume? In the end, it actually doesn’t matter. What matters is what your resume says about you.

The best part about knowing how to spell “resume” is that you don’t need to put it on your actual document. The first line of your resume should always be your name, not the word “resume.” Assuming you follow the typical conventions of resume writing, your hiring manager will know that the document is a resume. So the question is not “how do you spell resume”? The important question is whether your audience will know it’s your resume!

The Top of Your Resume

Thus, make sure the top of your resume includes, at a minimum, the following data:

  • Your name
  • Your phone number
  • Your email

Thus, you’ll make it easy for your hiring manager to know that the contents of your resume, well-presented and compelling, is about you and that you are easily available for contact by the easiest methods.

Not sure what to put on the rest of your resume? Everyday Resumes is the right choice for affordable resume writing.

 

 

How Many Pages Should A Resume Be

How Many Pages Should A Resume Be?

Writing a resume can be nerve-wracking, so much so that sometimes you might not even know where to start. Other times, you may feel as though you are writing too much so this is an important concept that you need to understand. So how many pages should a resume be? Of course, if you are a senior executive, you may have a deeper career history than someone who recently has come out of college, which of course will mean that you need three pages to detail your exceptional executive career history.  But if you’re the right Everyday Resumes job seeker, meaning you’re a nurse, teacher, store manager, business analyst, accountant, and so on, two pages is about the right length.

A Resume That’s Too Short

The normal standard for a resume is one or two pages. What's the right length for your resume? By: Andy Hay
The normal standard for a resume is one or two pages. How many pages should a resume be? What’s the right length for your resume? By: Andy Hay

A resume that is too short won’t offer enough information to the potential employer. You need to make sure that they have enough to go off because if they don’t feel as though they know anything about you then you can’t expect them to schedule you in for an interview. Make sure that you explain your experience and what you bring to the table, and don’t miss out any important details such as the courses you have been on or the various achievements you have accomplished.

A Resume That’s Too Long

If your resume is too long then there is a chance that your employer won’t actually get to the end of it. On top of this, it is most likely filled with fluff or words that aren’t actually needed. This can deter a potential employer, so having it concise and to the point is always a good idea if you want to make the most out of every job you apply for.

So all in all, as long as you have a resume that is between 1 and 2 pages long, you really are doing all right, but if you have less or more, try and tweak it so it is more representative of you and your abilities.

How to Write an Objective for a Resume: Don’t Bother!

How to Write an Objective for a Resume: Don’t Bother!

If you are applying for a job then it is understandable that you will want to do everything you can to make sure that you have your resume perfectly planned and constructed. This is easier said than done when you don’t know anything about resumes and that is why a lot of people start out by writing an objective. When you write an objective, you will be able to start off your resume by stating exactly what you want but this is actually something you want to avoid. The main reason for this is because it takes up word count that you could be using to sell yourself and everything you do. On top of this, if you state exactly what job you want, it looks as though you are only open to set positions and this can cause you to lose opportunities at a later date.

How to Write an Objective for a Resume: Don't Bother!
How to Write an Objective for a Resume: Don’t Bother! By: thematthewknot

So as you can see, if you want to learn how to write an objective for a resume, you really shouldn’t be wasting your time because it doesn’t add to the value of your resume and the amount of time you spend planning it all out really wouldn’t be worth it. After all, you could use that same word count to emphasise your skills, to better explain your experience and anything else you might want to cover. If you want to find out more about your resume or if you want to find out how to write a resume in the first place or if you want to find out more then all you need to do is contact your local resume writer today to see how they can help you to get the perfect resume and your dream job at the same time.

 

What is a Cover Letter for a Resume?

What is a Cover Letter for a Resume?

If you are reading this post, then there is a high chance that you are thinking to yourself “what is a cover letter for a resume?” The best way to explain this would be to look at it from the employer’s point of view. If you were sent a document entitled “resume” to your email, would you open it if it didn’t have an introduction? This is what a cover letter is for. A cover letter makes your potential employer want to read your resume as well as making sure that they have a keen interest in you and what you have to offer. It draws them in while also giving you the chance to explain a bit about yourself and what you can offer them as an individual. If you just send your resume without a cover letter, then there is a high chance that your interviewer won’t even look at it because cover letters are becoming an essential part of a job application.

What Is Included in a Cover Letter?

What is a Cover Letter for a Resume?
What is a Cover Letter for a Resume? By: Betsy Weber

In your cover letter, you will need to include your name and some information about yourself. Remember that this is the time for you to really sell yourself and you need to do everything you can to engage the person who is about to read your resume. Another thing to remember is that this is the first thing they will read, so if you have a stellar resume but a bad cover letter, the first impression you will leave will be a bad one so it is really something you need to keep in mind when you are piecing it all together.

So, what is a cover letter for a resume? Think about the right strategies and craft your own–or hire a professional to help you with it today.

How Examples of Cover Letters for Resume Writing Can Help

How Examples of Cover Letters for Resume Writing Can Help

If you want to write a resume or a cover letter then you need to do everything you can to make yourself stand out from the crowd. This is easier said than done when you are going up against potentially hundreds of other people that might have skills that surpass your own. So what can you do about this? The first thing would be to look up example cover letters. You may think that a cover letter example can’t possibly help you unless it is an example of the same industry you are applying for but they are great for giving you an idea of the layout you should be using, the font and even the way it is worded. After all, first impressions really are everything and if you make a good first impression then you can increase your chances of landing your dream job.

Cover Letter Help and Assistance

Examples of cover letters for resume writing can pull your application out of the pack--or make you look like a carbon copy.
Examples of cover letters for resume writing can pull your application out of the pack–or make you look like a carbon copy. By: Jeff Turner

When you look up examples of cover letters for resume writing, you can also find out what vocabulary is used and how to wrap the letter up with a credible pitch for an interview. This is ideal because it is the end note that will make them want to contact you and it is a great way for you to introduce your resume so they actually want to read it until the very end. So as you can see, your cover letter really is everything and it is your first chance to make a solid impression. It is well worth spending that extra 5 minutes looking up examples for cover letters and it may even be worth hiring someone to do it for you, because that dream job could be just around the corner and it won’t take you long to get started either.

But: Buyer Beware When Looking Examples of Cover Letters for Resume Writing

One final note: Your cover letter must be unique. Copying an example of a cover letter you found on the web can sink your application. You can guess that your competition is copying cover letters found on the web. So ensure that your cover letter is unique to your career history and current goal.

Need help with your cover letter? Everyday Resumes will write your cover letter for your resume from scratch.

Top Ten Transferable List of Skills for Resume Success

Top Ten Transferable List of Skills for Resume Success

What's on your list of skills for resume writing that directly speaks to the job you want?
What’s on your list of skills for resume writing that directly speaks to the job you want?

Though many job seekers are unaware of it, all of their prior job experience can be an asset that ensures resume success. It is important for job seekers to understand the value of transferable list of skills for resume impact to attract an interview and, ultimately, a job offer.

Critically, evaluating your skill set in light of your future hiring manager’s needs can help you determine what skills are transferable to that new role, even if you are not formally trained in that area of expertise or job function.

The top ten transferable list of skills for resume success include:

1. Consulting

Employees should consider consulting as a transferable skill. Think about the acquired years of experience in hands-on positions. That experience grants employees the ability to provide consulting to others, sometimes without respect to the specific industry.

2. Management

Management is not always about managing staff—it can be management of people, teams, or daily work flow. For example, employees in warehousing and distribution are subjected to daily time constraints and production quotas that require perfecting time management skills and logistics management.

3. Supervision

Supervision, like management, may include staff or specific project supervision from start up to completion. These are sets of transferable skills that should be described on a resume.

4. Mentoring

In nearly every workplace, there is the “go-to” employee who seems to know where to locate equipment, staff members, resources, technical expertise, and otherwise “hidden” information that contributes to company success. Consider adding mentoring to a resume if responsibilities of a job include providing assistance to new hires and coaching teammates.

5. Human Resources

Human resources skills include a broad swath of expertise, such as training, benefits, employee recruitment, succession planning, and more, often irrespective of industry.

6. Research and Development

Every job includes a certain amount of research and development. An administrative or executive assistant is often required to research data on business competitors and “develop” the data into comprehensive management reports. Also, typical research and development expertise can pertain to laboratory experience, product development, process creation, or even root cause analysis.

7. Training

When an employee contributes to teammates’ development, that is training expertise even when the training is informal. Formalized training, on the other hand, can take place in classroom environments or in onboarding of new employees.

8. Technical Writing

This is an area of transferable skills that is borne of job experience and writing skills. Once a job is mastered, employees have the ability to create job descriptions for personnel, training suggestions for human resources and write technical reports for management and also for promotional purposes.

9. Sales and Marketing

Many jobs require employees to become involved in sales and marketing whether by direct contact with customers or through interface with vendors for their customers. Consider the amount of time and experience gained by customer contact that helps sales and marketing.

10. Public Relations

Many employees find themselves setting up annual company programs which include dealing with advertisements, media promotions, communications, and public relations in general.

In conclusion, when thinking about your specific list of skills for resume writing success, consider all of the experience you have. Critically review it to identify top transferable, marketable expertise, making your list of skills for resume writing unique, powerful, and compelling.

How to Write a Resume for a Job that You’ve Never Had Before

How to Write a Resume for a Job that You’ve Never Had Before

It may be a struggle at first to decipher how to write a resume for a job you’ve never had before, since the requirements are all brand new to you.

The best way to resolve this common roadblock is to start by developing a strong understanding of the position and what qualifications the employer is looking for.

In order to write a resume for this new job, keep those credentials in mind and decide how to successfully highlight the qualities you possess that line up well with that list.

Buzz Aldrin probably had to write a resume for a job he'd never had before, either.
Buzz Aldrin probably had to write a resume for a job he’d never had before, either. By: NASA on The Commons

A great place to start with writing a resume for a job you’ve never had is to get creative with the way you present your experience for the given job. While you may have never had the specific job before, you most likely have a wide variety of traits, skills, and training that would be useful for that position. Brainstorm and highlight the areas in your previous jobs that would be helpful and useful to include in your resume for the new job. Leave out any extra information that is not relevant to the position you are applying for.

In crafting a resume for uncharted territory in the job world, outlining job experience may be less important than accentuating training, volunteer work, and hobbies you’ve participated in outside of the work day. Try to think about personal experiences and interests you have partaken in and the relevant skills you attained during that time. For example, if you have had extensive experience with certain computer programs or software necessary for the job you want, include that as a skill on your resume. Even though you may not have acquired those skills during a job you previously held, they can still be included as personal information that is applicable to the job.

Beyond computer skills and training, personal knowledge gained through coursework and classes can be included as well. During your high school or college career, reflect on courses you took that assisted you in learning important skills that would be seen as vital for the present job you are pursuing. In your professional life, consider extra training, conference attendance, volunteerism, and relationships with other departments and customers as well. Describe the value of each of these in your resume, explaining how they apply and why possessing those skills will make you an asset to the hiring managers company.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to fill up your whole resume strictly with job experience. Using volunteer work, coursework, and personal traits will help to spice up your resume, even if you’ve never held the desired job before. Tell the reader what will make you the best fit for the job based on a variety of information to back that up. By knowing how to apply these suggestions on how to write your resume for a job you’ve never had before, the possibilities will be so much greater. You will know how to write a resume for a job that is out of your direct experience and be able to tailor your resume for any job you desire, without fear that you do not have adequate experience.

How to List References on a Resume? Deliver this Extra Page in Your Interview

How to List References on a Resume? Deliver this Extra Page in Your Interview

Knowing how to list references on a resume is one of the most important things to know for a candidate. The reference list holds a lot of weight, as it can set one applicant apart from hundreds of others. Some companies might ask for references initially because they want to check references before they even call potential candidates for interviews. Others more typically wait to ask for your references at the time of the interview. Thus, you should not include references on a resume you are sending out as part of a job application.

How to List References on a Resume by Type

Many types of references exist:

Ask your references before including them in your job search--and never put their names on your resume.
Ask your references before including them in your job search–and never put their names on your resume. By: thetaxhaven
  • The colleague: Your colleague has worked side-by-side with you. This person can offer a great deal of insight about the person’s personality, dedication and the like.
  • The supervisor: The supervisor, or the manager, is the person to whom you reported. You might not want to choose a current manager to serve as a reference, as this might “give you away” as a job seeker; instead, ask a former manager with whom you have had a good relationship.
  • The customer: Certain positions allow workers to get close to their customers, and those customers can provide references for them.
  • The personal reference: Acquaintances and friends can serve as personal references, although these might not carry the same weight or influence as does the reference of a professional connection.

How to List References on a Resume

First, include your references not on your resume but on a separate sheet, with the same letterhead as that presented on your resume and cover letter. For each reference you are listing, include the reference’s full name, the position that the person held, and that person’s current email and / or phone number. Also helpful to include are the number of years that the reference has known you as well as a description of the nature of your business relationship and its context. For example, you could write that you worked under one of your references as an opening or closing assistant in a retail environment, particularly if you are seeking a retail position.

For example, if you are including John Smith as a reference, you might present his information like this:

John Smith, Professional Resume Writer, Everyday Resumes, (800) 300-4336, jsmith@everydayresumes.com

I worked for Mr. Smith for 5 years as a professional resume writer with Everyday Resumes.

Some Special Notes about References for Your Job Search

Most employers will not accept family members as references, but they will accept friends if those friends can give a reference that pertains to the job. For example, a high school or university friend could attest to the applicant’s membership in a sports clubs, student associations, and leadership, which could help someone who is applying for a coaching position.

A second special note concerns asking your references to recommend you before you send their names to your future employer. On the one hand, you can politely ask their permission to use their names, which can be beneficial to your strategy, not to mention your professional relationship. On the other, and if they agree to serve as a reference, you can coach them on what aspects of your business relationship would be most helpful or interesting to your future manager.

How to List References on a Resume with Help from a Professional Resume Writing Service

A professional resume writing service is full of professionals who are experienced, articulate, and resourceful. They can help you choose your references and design a resume layout that you also can use on your reference sheet.